Dr. Rose returns from sabbatical

7 years ago Triangle 0

by Ericka Simpson
Assistant Editor

Associate Professor of Psychology Clark Rose returns to campus after taking a sabbatical. During his time he helped produce a DVD and manual concerning last semester's christianity and psychology symposium.
Associate Professor of Psychology Clark Rose returns to campus after taking a sabbatical. During his time he helped produce a DVD and manual concerning last semester's christianity and psychology symposium.

During the fall 2010 semester, the Psychology Department operated without Associate Professor of Psychology Clark Rose while he took his first sabbatical.

Every seven years a professor is eligible to take a sabbatical, which can be a full semester without teaching while still receiving pay, a full year working halftime with pay or a full year without teaching receiving half pay. For a professor to gain such an arrangement, a proposal outlining why the professor needs a sabbatical must be submitted and approved by the academic vice president and president of Bryan College.

Rose chose to take his sabbatical in the fall because in the spring of 2010 the Psychology Department worked with the Bryan Center for Critical Thought and Practice to host “The Five Views of Christian Thought and Psychology,” on campus.

Bryan brought in a panel of five speakers who each represented a different view of psychology and an editor Eric Johnson, who acted as a mediator. From this panel, a book edited by Johnson was released in early fall, “Psychology in Christianity: Five Views.”

The conference was professionally taped, and Rose’s job was to edit the footage and get it ready for production, which is one of the tasks he completed while on sabbatical.

During his time away from Bryan, Rose also wrote a manual for teachers, instructors and students who might be interested in the interaction of Christianity and psychology.

“The integration of faith and one’s discipline is important,” Rose said. “It is one of my passions.”

Besides working on projects, Rose said he had the opportunity to get involved in a men’s study group at church as well as spend more time with his family.

His son, Reece, runs cross country for Episcopal School of Knoxville (Tenn.), and Rose traveled to watch him run at the state meet. His daughter plays volleyball and basketball, and he attended some of her games as well.

Rose and his son also went on his son’s first mission trip to Jamaica where they ministered to the children at an orphanage in Robin’s Nest.

“[The sabbatical] was definitely a time of renewal,” said Rose.

During the fall, Rose’s mother-in-law was diagnosed with ovarian cancer, and he and his wife traveled to Virginia to spend time with her.

“I could not have done that with a normal schedule,” he said.

Being on sabbatical was refreshing for Rose because he said he was in a “different rhythm of life” and “could pay more attention to God speaking to [him].”

Rose has returned to teaching a normal load of 12 hours this semester and said he is glad to be back in the classroom.

“I missed the interaction and relationships with students,” he said. “I also missed my colleagues.”

Over the years, Steve Bradshaw, professor of psychology, has not only been a mentor but a friend and the two enjoy playing ping-pong against students after lunch, according to Rose.

“The sabbatical program is good for allowing teachers to do other things,” Rose said. “But my desire is to teach, which is why I chose a place like Bryan College.”